Last autumn, Dagbladet received a chronicle from Inger titled “This chronicle may be controversial because I’m dead.” She argued that even a dead woman should be heard, because she thought her point of view on euthanasia was an important contribution to the Norwegian debate about legalizing euthanasia.

By Merete Skogrand

European Press Prize’s Distinguished Reporting Award 2020 Nominee

One day, Inger Staff-Poulsen (57) told her husband that she had decided, in order to be in charge of both her own life and death, to “euthanize herself.” As much as Inger loved life, she couldn’t risk leaving it until a time when she still had the power to live. She was also afraid of getting so ill that she didn’t have the power to die. Last autumn, Dagbladet received a chronicle from Inger titled “This chronicle may be controversial because I’m dead.” At that time, she had been dead for four months. But she argued that even a dead woman should be heard, because she thought her point of view on euthanasia was an important contribution to the Norwegian debate about legalizing euthanasia.